Dental Phobia – How To Beat It

Definition

Quite simply dental phobia is an irrational fear of a visit to the dentist or anything relating to the dentist.

Am I Suffering From Dental Phobia ?

If you answer yes to any of the following questions you may be suffering from dental phobia :

1. Do you remember all or any visits to your dentist as unpleasant ?
2. Do you think that your dentist will make embarrassing remarks about your lack of oral hygiene or health ?
3. Do you avoid or even cancel appointments with your dentist due to anxiety ?
4. Do you have feelings of anxiety while in the dentist’s waiting room ?
5. Do you have feelings of anxiety or panic while seated in your dentist’s chair ?
6. Does seeing dental equipment or the sound of the dentist’s drill send shivers down your spine ?
7. Does the thought of an injection make you feel anxious or scared ?

Why Am I Suffering From Dental Phobia ?

A phobia or a fear of something quite ordinary can have many triggers. Below is a list of some triggers relating to dental phobia :

1. A past visit to your dentist was unpleasant in some way, for example, remarks were made. by your dentist or dentist’s assistant that were upsetting.
2. You suffered pain or discomfort during a visit to your dentist.
3. You feel that when you visit your dentist that you are not in control.
4. You are embarrassed about the condition of your teeth or oral hygiene.
5. You suffer from anxiety at the very thought of your dental clinic, the instruments and equipment even the white gowns and rubber gloves they wear.

Dental Phobia, How can I Stop It ?

1. Overcoming your fear.

Realizing that your fear is irrational and that you are dental phobic is a good start. By making use of some of the techniques listed below you can educate your mind to accept that a visit to the dentist need not be a frightening experience.

2. Finding an understanding dentist.

It is important to find a dental practice where not only the dentist understands your phobia also the dentist’s staff and assistants do too. Most dentists will know how to treat a patient that is dental phobic.

3. Honesty.

Don’t be embarrassed about the condition of your teeth or oral health. A good understanding dentist will not make unsympathetic remarks that may up set you, so be honest from day one about how you feel.

4. Communicate.

Good communication with your dentist and dentist’s staff will help you feel more relaxed during your visit. By communicating your anxiety you could quell the fear of the unknown. An understanding dentist will know when, for example, it is time for you to have a breather or sense when you are becoming anxious or in pain.

5. Be knowledgeable.

Make your self aware of the treatments that are required and available by reading information in your practice or do some research on the Internet also simply ask your dentist.

6. Relax.

There are many simple relaxation techniques that can be employed such as breathing exercise. There is much information on the Internet on the subject of relaxation. Being relaxed before and during your visit to the dentist is paramount. Your dentist may also recommend medication such as valium to help you relax.

7. Be distracted.

Allowing oneself to be distracted is a technique that will help take your mind off a visit to the dentist. Listen to the music piped into the surgery, in extreme cases some dentist’s will allow the use of personal media players providing they don’t hinder communication and treatment.

8. Pain control.

Chances are you will require a local anesthetic so one of your worries may include a fear of an injection. Dentists like those from Mt. Pleasant Dental can provide you options to make you comfortable. It is important you communicate this with your dentist, he or she will have methods to help overcome your fear and also may be able to advise alternatives such as nitrous oxide, sometimes known as “laughing gas” although this is less common these days.

2 Responses to Dental Phobia – How To Beat It

  1. Alexa Stone says:

    Realizing that your fear is irrational and that you are dental phobic is a good start. By making use of some of the techniques listed below you can educate your mind to accept that a visit to the dentist need not be a frightening experience.

  2. Christine says:

    I’m not sure using words such as irrational is useful. A fear or phobia has a reason – something has happened, at one point in Scotland – when I was young I’m now 47 it was common practise to fill childrens teeth, so lots of people my age had fillings done which they did not need with blunt over used needles use for anesthetic, it was actually barbaric. I am so upset having just found out I require 3 root canal treatments and I have terrible gum desease, I am in danger of loosing my teeth. My vanity has ensured that I have gone to dentist regularly over the years but my fear has now grown so huge I cannot sit still in the chair and just silently cry. I now need to find a sedation dentist – it is a black cloud over my life and comments like – “no one enjoys going to the dentist” and it’s not painful more uncomfortable just mean nothing to me. My dream would be for someone to give me a general and I wake up – I don’t even care if I’m in pain, I just want to wake up and find it all done. Educate my mind? Don’t think you should go for a career with dental photoc patients the language you use show’s a complete lack of understanding.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *